Mediterranean Diet May Keep Your Mind Healthier in Old Age

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) — In news that sounds a bit like it came straight from a sci-fi thriller, researchers say that eating too much meat might shrink your brain.

On the flip side, however, eating healthy foods from the so-called Mediterranean diet may help your brain stay in good shape as you get older, the new study suggests. The researchers said that people over 65 who ate more fish, vegetables, fruit, grains and olive oil had a larger brain volume than a similar group who didn’t follow a Mediterranean diet.

“It was encouraging to see that the more you adhere to this Mediterranean diet, the more protection you get against brain atrophy [shrinkage],” said study author Yian Gu, an assistant professor of neuropsychology at Columbia University in New York City. “For people interested in the diet and lifestyle factors leading to better health, I think this is another study consistent with previous studies that indicate the Mediterranean diet is a healthy diet,” she added.

But Gu noted that her study’s observational findings cannot prove a definitive cause-and-effect relationship between diet and brain volume. The study was only designed to find an association.

Findings from the research were published online Oct. 21 in the journal Neurology.

Previous research has linked the Mediterranean diet to a lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease, the study said. The diet stresses the consumption of vegetables, legumes (beans, peas and lentils), fruits, cereals, fish and monounsaturated fats such as olive oil, the study authors said. The eating plan also includes a low intake of meat, poultry, saturated fats and dairy products, as well as mild to moderate amounts of alcohol, according to the researchers.

For the study, Gu and her colleagues split 674 adults into two groups based on how closely their diets aligned with the Mediterranean diet. Their average age was 80 years. All participants underwent MRI scans of their brains to measure total brain volume and thickness. They also completed questionnaires about their food choices and eating patterns.

The researchers found that brain volumes of those who didn’t follow a Mediterranean diet were smaller than those who did. The difference was minor in overall size — equated to about five years of aging, the study authors said.

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